9 Effective Eloqua Landing Pages to Leverage in Your Next Digital Campaign

9 Effective Eloqua Landing Pages to Leverage in Your Next Digital Campaign

Last updated on by Marcus Johnson in Landing Page Examples

Acquired by Oracle in 2012, Eloqua is an industry leader in marketing automation by providing rich digital experiences throughout each stage of the buyer’s journey. To help with this, Eloqua uses post-click landing pages as part of their strategy to engage prospects and move them down the marketing funnel.

post-click landing pages are standalone pages that convince visitors to take action using persuasive elements like benefit-oriented headlines, hero shots, and social proof. The action on the page could be to download an ebook, register for a webinar, sign up for a free trial, product demonstration, and more.

Now let’s evaluate a variety of Eloqua post-click landing pages and see how they persuade visitors to take action. (You will notice that a majority of the examples display the Oracle Marketing Cloud branding, which is the parent brand for which Eloqua belongs.)

9 Eloqua post-click landing page examples that can inspire your next page design

1. To promote their lead scoring guide

This image shows the lead scoring guide Eloqua post-click landing page

What the page does well:

  • No header navigation means visitors aren’t immediately distracted by other links and the logo in the header doesn’t link back to the main website. Both of these keep visitors focused on evaluating the guide.
  • The headline clearly describes the offer and the secondary headline gives additional information into what prospects can expect.
  • The orange CTA button is distinct and contrasts well with the rest of the page, drawing attention to it and enticing prospects to take action.
  • Bulleted copy provides the four main takeaways of downloading the guide.
  • The 5-form field keeps the input process relatively short.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • Social media share icons are distracting and draw too much attention considering the white space around them. A better practice would be to include these social share icons on the thank you page.
  • Not enough white space makes the page feel crowded. For example, more space could be added between the copy, image, and the form. Doing this would allow visitors to scan the page easier and focus on each element individually.
  • The image is meant to give a preview of the guide but it’s too small. A better choice would be a high resolution image of someone reading the lead scoring guide.
  • The “Download Now” CTA copy is not as persuasive as it could be. Changing the copy to “Send Me the Guide” is more relevant and personalized to the offer.
  • Exit links in the footer give visitors an opportunity to leave the page without taking action. Since this page is meant to generate downloads of their lead scoring guide, why are there links to the Eloqua homepage and their blog?

2. To generate downloads of their content marketing ebook

This image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page that offers visitors their ebook

What the page does well:

  • The Eloqua logo doesn’t link back to the main website so visitors are more likely to stay on the page and not tempted to click away.
  • The copy is informative without being too long for visitors to skim. The copy can be consumed easily, which allows visitors to make a quick decision on the offer.
  • Bulleted copy (enclosed in the gray box) explains what visitors can expect from the ebook.
  • The CTA button color is distinct and doesn’t appear elsewhere on the page. This helps the CTA “pop” off the page and moves the visitor’s eyes towards the button.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The headline never makes it clear that the offer is about an ebook. The header tells visitors that the page is about “strategies for generating demand with content marketing” but it doesn’t explain what form the offer comes in. Explicitly saying that the offer is for an ebook in the header can help visitors make a decision faster. Using the word “free” could also persuade visitors to download the offer as well.
  • Missing video content, replaced with “content unavailable” makes the page and Eloqua look bad. If they’re going to generate traffic to the page, they must ensure the page is updated at the very least.
  • “Content unavailable” in the header is also a distraction and makes the page look unprofessional. Why would any visitor to this page download this ebook if the page looks unprofessional?
  • The “Submit” CTA copy is bland and and doesn’t inspire action. Rewriting it to “Download Your Free Content Marketing Ebook” is more enticing and would likely generate more clicks.
  • The lack of white space makes the page feel crowded. Additional white space could make this page easier to skim so that prospects could evaluate the offer better.
  • No relevant image makes it harder for visitors to relate to the offer. Even an image of the ebook cover could help tremendously because it would show the content visitors can expect to receive.
  • Footer links back to the Eloqua website (Oracle Marketing Cloud) and to the company blog take visitors away from the offer. Eliminating these links would reduce the distractions and keep visitors focused on the page.

3. To generate downloads of their social data ebook

This image shows the Eloqua landing that offers visitors their social data ebook

What the page does well:

  • The Oracle Marketing Cloud logo is not linked to the homepage or elsewhere. Removing this link helps eliminate the temptation to click away from this page.
  • No header navigation means visitors can’t easily click back to the main website.
  • The graphic is relevant to offer of a social data ebook. The smartphones and tablets in the graphic connect well with the offer.
  • The ebook cover page gives visitors a preview at what they can expect once they complete the form.
  • The checkbox beneath the form is unchecked by default so only truly interested prospects will opt-in to the newsletter email list.
  • The privacy policy gives visitors more confidence to enter their personal data in the form. But a better option would be for the link to generate a pop-up instead of opening up a new window.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The social media links give visitors an opportunity to leave the post-click landing page without first considering the offer. Furthermore, the links are listed before the post-click landing page headline which takes attention away from it.
  • No white space, especially above the fold, makes it difficult to scan the page. The Oracle logo, social share buttons, headline, and graphic are too close together and should be spaced out to give visitors a better post-click landing page experience.
  • The concise copy is nice, but it could be displayed in bullet point format to make it easier to scan.
  • The red CTA color is the same as the Oracle logo directly below it. Redesigning the button in a more contrasting color like green would draw more attention.
  • “Submit” is among the worst CTA copy to inspire visitors to act. Rewriting the button copy to something more relevant to the ebook would likely produce more clicks, such as “I Want the Ebook” or “Download My Ebook Now.”
  • The 2015 copyright is outdated, which could cause prospects to pause before downloading. If the copyright and post-click landing page are outdated, is the ebook and the contents therein outdated as well?
  • A testimonials section could be added to inform visitors how the ebook improved their mobile strategy.

4. To encourage CMOs to download their CMO report

Eloqua uses Twitter to promote content offers to its audience. The key difference with this example is that it jumps from Eloqua branded content (the tweet below) to send visitors to an Oracle blog post on how CMOs make data driven decisions. For online users who aren’t familiar with the Eloqua-Oracle relationship, this kind of disconnect can hurt conversions.

This image shows the tweet used to promote the Eloqua post-click landing page for CMOs

This image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page used to promote their report for CMOs

What the page does well:

  • The image of the report gives visitors a look at what they’ll upon downloading.
  • The offer can be evaluated above the fold, allowing visitors to quickly make a decision on downloading the report.
  • The newsletter checkbox is not checked by default so visitors have to manually select the option to receive additional Oracle content.
  • The privacy policy link allows visitors to see how Oracle will share user information, if at all.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The header navigation gives visitors too many options to leave without fully considering the offer. Similarly, the logo links to the Oracle Marketing Cloud homepage, which acts as another exit link.
  • Social media links take focus away from the CMO report offer. Visitors need to review the content before they decide to share it so these links should be on the thank you page, not on this post-click landing page.
  • The 7-field form increases friction and would likely cause visitors to hesitate in downloading the report. If this offer was further down the marketing funnel, such as for a product demo, this many fields would be more appropriate.
  • The CTA button color is easy to miss on a page that is mostly light in color.
  • “Submit” is the worst CTA copy to motivate visitors to convert. Practically anything would be better than “submit.” “I Want the Report” would likely produce better results.

5. To promote their email deliverability guide

Twitter users who click on this Eloqua tweet are sent to a blog post with a CTA for this email deliverability guide:

This image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page that offers visitors their email deliverability ebook

What the page does well:

  • The headline describes what visitors can expect from the guide.
  • The graphic is relevant to the offer because the email graphic fits the concept of the email deliverability guide.
  • Bulleted copy draw attention and tells visitors the main sections of the guide.
  • The newsletter opt-in box is unchecked by default. Had Eloqua/Oracle Marketing Cloud already checked this box upon arrival, it would have been a sneaky way for them to add subscribers.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The logo in the header links back to the Oracle Cloud Marketing homepage, which gives visitors an easy opportunity to leave without considering the offer.
  • The image of the book could be larger draw more attention.
  • Duplicate form labels are unnecessary. Removing the gray labels inside each form field would help simplify the page.
  • The CTA color is the same red as the Oracle logo below it. A better option would be to change the CTA color to one that doesn’t appear on the page, like green.
  • Social media links give visitors a chance to leave the post-click landing page. Eliminating these icons can increase conversions.
  • Adding testimonials or award badges could add credibility to this post-click landing page. In particular, testimonials about the benefits of the guide could help convince visitors to take action.

6. To offer their marketing technology guide

Clicking the link in this Eloqua tweet sends people to a post-click landing page with the marketing technology guide:

This image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page used to promote their marketing technology guide

What the page does well:

  • The absence of a navigation menu in the header and footer makes it that much harder for visitors to exit this post-click landing page.
  • The animated video is immediately eye-catching and clearly explains the value of marketing technology and directly connects to the guide being offered.
  • The copy defines the offer succinctly and helps visitors make a quick decision on whether or not the guide will provide them with value.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The headline is not compelling. post-click landing page headlines should be compelling and engaging right off the bat so that visitors stay interested enough to continue evaluating the offer. “The Platform is the Foundation” doesn’t do that.
  • The near 3-minute video is too long to hold visitors’ attention. Keeping the video under 30 seconds would be better.
  • There are multiple offers on this page below the fold. Every promotion deserves its own post-click landing page so if this page is promoting a marketing stack guide, that should be the only content offer up for grabs.
  • Removing the logo link in the header would keep visitors on the page instead of giving them an outlet off of it.
  • The social media share links open up new tabs, taking visitors off of the page. They are also in a poor position, directly below the CTA. If the links must be included, these links could be moved away from the CTA and open a pop-up instead of a new tab.
  • The 2016 copyright could confuse visitors and make them believe that the offer is out of date. Updating the copyright date would clear this issue up.

7. To promote their data management paper

This image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page used to promote their data activation results guide

What the page does well:

  • The Z-Pattern layout helps direct visitors where to look as they scan the page. First, the headline, then the graphic, down and to the left at the bulleted copy, and over to the right at the form.
  • The logo in the header is not linked anywhere so it doesn’t provide an easy escape route away from this offer.
  • The red headlines act as visual cues, moving the visitors’ eyes down towards the CTA.
  • The bulleted copy allows visitors to quickly evaluate the offer and make a decision on downloading the paper.
  • Statistics in the copy tease the offer because the report has “even more stats” to help marketers improve their campaign performance.
  • The form headline “Read the Paper” serves as a call-to-action because it helps direct visitors where to go next by completing the form.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The graphic doesn’t seem related to the offer. A better choice would be an image of someone reading the paper on a desktop or tablet.
  • Social media links in the header allow visitors to leave the page without fully evaluating the offer.
  • Adding a visual cue, such as an arrow pointed at the form, would draw even more attention and imply that visitors should input their information.
  • Adding social proof in the form of testimonials or a total downloads counter would add credibility to this post-click landing page.
  • Reducing the number of form fields (or not making all fields required) would reduce friction and could potentially increase conversions.

8. To generate downloads of their financial services marketing kit

This image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page that promotes their marketing kit

What the page does well:

  • The Z-Pattern highlights the most important elements: the headline, graphic, video, copy, the kit’s contents, and the form.
  • Zero navigation links in the header and the logo is unlinked, which keeps visitors from leaving the page without evaluating the offer.
  • The video does not autoplay — helping improve the post-click landing page experience.
  • The word “free” is used on the CTA, which lets visitors know there is no cost obligation to download the marketing kit.
  • The CTA copy is personalized and moves visitors to take action. “Download Your Free Kit” sounds much more appealing than “submit.”
  • The “Also included in the kit” section is a great way to showcase the additional information being provided through the offer.
  • The privacy policy is right underneath the form. Doing this gives prospects the necessary information to see how their information will be shared, if at all.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • The image is not relevant to the offer. The graphic in the header looks to be a mix-and-match of different elements. A better option would be using an image of an individual reading the marketing kit on their desktop or smartphone.
  • The video is too long. At more than eight minutes, visitors will undoubtedly stop watching and not consume a majority of the video’s content.
  • Adding white space to the page would help attract more attention at certain elements. For example, below the video and to the left of the form would benefit from white space.
  • Including social proof would add trust and credibility to this offer.
  • The red CTA color has already been used multiple times on the page including the logo, the headline, the graphic, and the banner.
  • The 2014 copyright is outdated and could confuse visitors and make them believe that the offer has expired.

9. To persuade visitors to request a demo

this image shows the Eloqua post-click landing page used to promote their product demo

What the page does well:

  • No header navigation menu or linked logo means visitors can’t easily escape this demo post-click landing page right off the bat.
  • Bulleted copy describes what Oracle solutions will be covered during the demonstration.
  • The 8-field form is appropriate for an offer of this magnitude because if a prospect finds this post-click landing page, they’re most likely in decision mode. That means, Eloqua/Oracle will want to qualify the prospects as much as possible by collecting more personal information.
  • The write-in box allows prospects to submit feedback ahead of the demonstration so that Eloqua/Oracle can possibly tailor the demo to the prospect’s needs.
  • The privacy policy link inspires trust and gives visitors more confidence to complete the form. However, this could be more effective if the link generated a pop-up instead of opening a new window, which takes visitors away from the offer.
  • The red CTA color contrasts well with its immediate surrounding elements but the red banner across the top takes away from the CTA button. Redesigning the button in green or turquoise would help the button stand out more.
  • The opt-in checkbox underneath the form is not already checked. This means only truly interested prospects will opt-in to the list instead of automatically added by Oracle.

What the page could change or A/B test:

  • Social media links attract too much attention because they’re quickly noticeable and visitors haven’t had a chance to fully evaluate the offer yet. Removing these links and placing them on the thank you page would be more appropriate.
  • The headline could communicate the offer better. “Your One Stop Demo Resource Page” explains that this post-click landing page has something to do with an Oracle demonstration, but it doesn’t describe why scheduling a demo is beneficial.
  • The image is not relevant to the offer. Instead of a graphic, a better choice would be an image of a client using Eloqua on their desktop.
  • The white space underneath the copy disrupts the flow of the page. Instead, adding testimonials or award badges could be placed here to convince visitors to take action.
  • The CTA copy is uninspiring. Instead of submit, the CTA copy could use something more personalized, like “Schedule My Demo.”
  • The 2014 copyright in the footer could confuse visitors and make them believe the offer is out of date.

Which Eloqua post-click landing page was the most persuasive?

Eloqua knows that its visitors are experienced marketers looking for campaign personalization and real-time insights. They understand the need for optimized post-click landing pages that help marketers quickly find the value in their services and persuade them to take action.

Which Eloqua post-click landing page left the biggest impact on you?

Let us know in the comments below, then create a strong first impression with your prospects by building your next post-click landing page with Instapage. With our designer-friendly platform, you too can offer a personalized experience and generate maximum leads.

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